The way I eat does not affect my chances of getting pregnant
Being too thin or too heavy can reduce fertility. Consuming too few calories may prevent the woman’s ability to ovulate normally, while being overweight or obese can interfere with normal hormone function and fertility.

There is little evidence of any specific food’s ability to improve or decrease fertility.

Watch Dr. Claire Jones discuss ways to optimize natural fertility in the following video. It covers many misconceptions found on this page.

Please note, the following video may refer to male and female reproduction and infertility. However, for those individuals who do not identify as either male or female, but who also experience infertility related to conditions of the anatomical regions described, the content is applicable.

Optimizing Natural Fertility

Smoking is fine if you quit once you are pregnant.
False. Smoking has been shown to reduce fertility in several studies. Quit if you are thinking of becoming pregnant.

Coffee lowers your chances of getting pregnant
False. Drinking coffee in moderation has no impact on fertility.

Alcohol improves the chances of becoming pregnant
False. Excessive alcohol consumption has been shown to decrease fertility in women.

Prescription drugs have no effect on fertility
False. Some prescription drugs can alter hormonal balance. If you are considering a fertility treatment, it is important to share your medication history with your fertility doctor.

To maximize chances of natural conception, you need to have sex every day during your fertile window
False. Having sex every second or third day will give you the same fertility outcome as having sex every day.
I need to see a temperature rise on my basal body temperature graph before I have sex
False. To maximize chances of getting pregnant, it is best to have sexual intercourse two to three days before you ovulate, not during or after ovulation.
Unlike natural conception, fertility treatments are equally effective at any age
False. The effectiveness of fertility treatments depends on many factors, declining with egg provider’s age.
If I am less than 40 years old, there’s plenty of time to keep trying
False. Age has a major impact on the success rates of infertility treatments as well as your natural ability to conceive. By the age of 40 a healthy person trying to conceive with their own eggs has only a 5% chance of getting pregnant in a given month, naturally or otherwise. In addition, even young and otherwise healthy people can have medical conditions that affect fertility.

One of the examples of such conditions is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). In this video, Dr. Claire Jones reviews PCOS in detail:

Please note, the following video may refer to male and female reproduction and infertility. However, for those individuals who do not identify as either male or female, but who also experience infertility related to conditions of the anatomical regions described, the content is applicable.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

We recommend seeking fertility help after 1 year of trying for those under 35 and within 6 months for those 35 and up.

With a fertility treatment, I am likely to have twins or triplets
False. IVF with single embryo transfer, which we practice, will reduce the risk of multiple pregnancy to less than 1%.
If I miscarry, it would have been due to stress
Pregnancy loss is a complex matter and is usually due to chromosomal abnormality in the embryo.
Sperm function improves after two weeks of abstinence.
False. The best quality sperm is produced by ejaculation every two to three days. Prolonged abstinence results in the production of many damaged or dead sperm.
Wearing tight clothes will adversely affect the quality of my sperm
There is no scientific evidence to support this.